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1033
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1033
R&D
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Frequently Asked Questions

Question:  Why don't you include lens paper with your equipment?

Answer:  Lens paper tends to scratch the lens's Magnesium fluoride anti-reflection coating.  Over time these scratches dull the lens surface and eventually the lens would need to be replaced.  For Government issue, this is not a problem, but when my Customers are spending over $3,000.00 for my products, I want their lenses to last for decades.  I recommend using the same lens cleaning procedure I learned while in the USAF.  Click on the graphic below to download an Adobe.pdf that details proper lens cleaning.

Question: How do we do business with you?

Answer:  E-mail us. 

-  Individuals can contact me to:  Ask questions, Request information, Request a quote, etc.  Payment can be made via Credit Card, PayPal, Bank Check, or personal check.

-  Government Agencies can contact me via e-mail to:  Ask questions, Request information, Request a quote, Ask about quantity discounts, etc.  Payment can be made via Credit Card, Wide Area WorkForce (WAWF), Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT), terms such as Net 7 , Net 30, etc. and checks are always welcome. 

Question:  Can I call you on the phone?

Answer:  NO.  After the millions of phone calls and spam Faxes from people who refuse to get a life or a real job, we do not communicate via the phone.  If you manage to find a phone number you think will call us, it just goes to an answering machine that silently records you message.  This answering machine gets check once or twice a month, just in case a Law Enforcement Officer Customer or Government Agency that is trying to reach us.

Question:  Can night vision equipment go through the airport X-ray screening machines without getting damaged?

Answer:  Yes.  The X-ray screening machines do not harm American Made night vision equipment.  Thousands of ITT and L-3 scopes, monoculars, and goggles pass through these scanners every year with no damage observed or reported.

Question:  What does the Halo value have to do with a night vision device being weapons mounted?

Answer:  The Halo value of image tubes with an autogated power supply should be taken into consideration if the night vision device will be weapons mounted.  The Halo value is the diameter of the Halo seen around a point of light.  This Halo size is directly proportional to the distance the MicroChannel Plate (MCP) is from the PhotoCathode.  The lower the Halo value the shorter that distance is.  When an autogated tube is powered, the electrostatic fields between  the MCP and PhotoCathode change several thousand times per second between attracting and repelling each other.  The PhotoCathode is a very rigid structure that includes the corning glass faceplate, however, the MCP is roughly the size of a quarter made of glass having millions of small holes or channels in it.  As such the electrostatic forces flex the MCP's center towards and away from the PhotoCathode, which produces the distinctive whining noise coming from the equipment.  Recoil exacerbates this motion, so if the Halo value is too small the MCP will slam into the PhotoCathode causing damage seen as a large black spot. 

Question:  What is Collimation and why is it important to me?

Answer:  When building night vision goggles, selecting and installing the best tubes and optics is paramount.  The most important task after the build up is the Collimation.  We do our Collimation with a regularly inspected and tested TS-3895A test set.  Collimation is important because if not done or done incorrectly, your eyes try to adjust for each optical path of the monoculars going in slightly different directions.  This causes eye strain especially for Operators who wear glasses and can lead to headaches and blurred vision when the goggles are used for extended periods of time.

Below is a chart with the top graphic taken from the -23&P Technical Manual.  Each Black Block on the chart represents what one of the Optical channels or monoculars is focused on.  The TS-3895A tester uses a beam splitter to overlay one black block from the right side over the black block from the left side.  As you can see when the white dots are close enough the TM shows this condition to be collimated.  This Collimation can be Vertical, Horizontal or Diagonal.  The green graphics are pictures taken through my TS-3895A during the Collimation of this ANVIS-9.  On the left is a Close Vertical Alignment but not go enough so adjustments are made and the picture on the right shows a Close Horizontal Alignment but still not good enough.  After a final adjustment the Collimation is PERFECT left and right side blocks are perfectly aligned as seen the bottom picture.

Why do Perfect?  We are Professionals and the majority of our Customers are  Professionals from the U.S. Military, Law Enforcement, and Professionals in the Private Sector who rely on their equipment being rugged and reliable for long periods of continuous use. 

Question:  Can You obtain and sell us the Diopter Windows for the AN/AVS-10?

Answer:  Unfortunately, no.  Try as we may, we can not find any ANVIS-10 parts from any Commercial entities.  There may be some parts for the ANVIS-10s in the DLA System for obtaining through the 1033 Program.  Contact me for NSNs by clicking on the e-mail link below. 

We have devised a method for using the ANVIS-10 for those folks with less than 20 - 20 vision.  This procedure will be detailed in the NEWS or the 1033 Program ANVIS-10 Page.

E-mail us for more information

Proudly Made in the U.S.A.